Dairy Council Northern Ireland

Milk it for all it's worth


Industry

How is it made?

Cheese

Cheese is a food which has existed for thousands of years. In fact, the origins of cheese are thought to predate recorded history. Today, cheese remains a popular food around the world, and consumers can choose from a wide range of cheeses with varying flavours and textures. In 2009, approximately 40% of all milk from Northern Ireland farms which was used to make milk products was turned into cheese. Although advances in technology have meant that some stages in the cheese making process have changed slightly over the years, the basic principles have remained the same.

To make common cheeses, such as cheddar cheese, milk is firstly pasteurised (heated to a minimum of 71.7°C for at least 15 seconds) to kill any bacteria. The pasteurised milk is then cooled rapidly before being pumped into large cheese vats. Here, specially prepared, harmless bacteria, called ‘starter cultures’ are added. These ‘ripen’ the milk, and give the cheese its flavour.

Next an ingredient called ‘rennet’ is added to the milk which makes the milk separate into thick curds and runny whey. The curd is then cut into tiny particles which help release whey.

The curds and whey are then heated and stirred to about 39°C (although this will vary based on the type of cheese being made). Most soft cheeses do not need to be stirred for as long, and most fresh cheeses will not be cooked. The stirring continues for another hour and then the whey is drained off leaving the curds (cheese). Next the curd is stacked, cut and turned to release more whey. This is called ‘cheddaring’. A little salt is added and the cheese is cut into small pieces called chips. The chips are packed into a mould and pressed. Most soft cheeses, however, are not pressed.

The cheese is then taken out of the mould, wrapped in polythene and stored. The longer a cheese is stored, the stronger its flavour will be. Soft cheeses can be ripened or fresh. Fresh cheeses (such as cottage cheese) are not matured and are ready for consumption as soon as the process has been completed. Ripened cheeses (such as Brie) are left in rooms with controlled temperatures and humidity.

Examples of hard cheese: Cheddars (mature, mild, oak smoked, reduced–fat etc)

Examples of soft cheese: Cottage cheese, cream cheese, and Brie–type cheeses.

To find out what nutrients cheese contains, check out the dairy nutrition section. And there’s more on our cheese culture and heritage in Northern Ireland here.

May 16

Thank you for having us @RathmorePS - we really enjoyed our visit! https://t.co/ggcq…

Read Tweet

May 11

RT @DownthehatchNI: Today I was reminded that our dairy industry in NI is so impressi…

Read Tweet

May 05

RT @madigan_sharon: @RobertaAnding She presented in Belfast last week @DairyCouncilNI…

Read Tweet

May 04

RT @BazinShanghai: .@InvestNI .@DairyCouncilNI .@BazinShanghai great to see such a st…

Read Tweet

May 02

Over 3 years, DCNI’s export programme, jointly funded by the EU, has generated sale…

Read Tweet

April 30

RT @FarmingLifeNI: Export programme delivers sales of £24.6m https://t.co/GZZ78MZyUK…

Read Tweet

April 28

RT @madigan_sharon: A really nice update on #fodmap diets. Restriction of foods high…

Read Tweet

April 28

Thank you for coming @dlogan411 - pleased you enjoyed it. https://t.co/BWjKhN8G9N…

Read Tweet

April 28

Thanks @tamsyn_redpath - pleased you enjoyed it - and the sunshine…

Read Tweet

April 28

Thanks @liannem88 and all the delegates for coming along to the event. https://t.co/q…

Read Tweet

April 28

RT @TheGutHealthDoc: Latest #lowFODMAP research I’ll be chatting about today…

Read Tweet

April 27

RT @walsh_walshm3: Thanks @DairyCouncilNI for an excellent conference today. #DCNI201…

Read Tweet

April 27

Huge thanks to our fabulous conference speakers for a great day of nutrition and heal…

Read Tweet

April 27

A fascinating insight into exercise, hormones and disease prevention research from ou…

Read Tweet

From the farm to the fridge, the Dairy Council for Northern Ireland acts on behalf of the dairy industry, advertising and promoting the natural goodness and quality of Northern Ireland milk and dairy products.

Our primary function is to communicate factual information to allow individuals to make well informed choices about dairy products that they consume and to inform them of the benefits of including dairy products in a balanced diet. We use a wide range of media, which includes television, radio, press, magazine, posters and the internet. Our Advertising is complemented by public relations and promotional activities designed to communicate with specific groups.

Home delivery

Contact your nearest dairy to arrange delivery